DVT

Introduction:

Bedside ultrasound has been shown to correlate very well with formal duplex sonography in detecting deep vein thrombosis (DVT). A limited, two-point compression technique is generally employed which verifies flow and compressibility in the common femoral and popliteal veins.

Focused Questions:

  1. Is there flow in the vein?
  2. Is the vein compressible?

Video Overview:

Required Views:

1. Femoral vein

Probe position Image
Femoral vein probe position Compression of femoral vein
Notes
  • Visualize the femoral vein and femoral artery proximally, just distal to the inguinal ligament
  • Use color Doppler to check for flow in the vein (vein is usually medial to artery)
  • Check that the vein compresses totally
  • Often a split screen is used to show the vessels without (Left screen) and with compression (Right screen)
Abnormal Studies (click to enlarge)
femoral vein DVT

2. Popliteal vein

Probe position Image
Popliteal vein probe position Popliteal vein compression
Notes
  • Visualize the popliteal vein and artery in the popliteal fossa
  • Use color Doppler to check for flow in the vein (vein is usually superfical to artery)
  • Check that the vein compresses totally
  • Often a split screen is used to show the vessels without (Left screen) and with compression (Right screen)
Don’t miss our post on the Top 3 DVT articles.

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