Tag Archives: Tsung

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2014 Emergency and Critical Care Ultrasound CME Course

The Mount Sinai Department of Emergency Medicine hosted its annual ultrasound CME conference on April 25. Faculty, fellows, nurses and PAs from a number of institutions and specialties took part in our tenth annual course.

The course was directed by Bret Nelson, MD who introduced ultrasound physics and machine controls, followed by lectures on assessment of  airway and breathing (Jim Tsung, MD, MPH), cardiovascular ultrasound (Jennifer Huang, DO), trauma evaluation (Phil Andrus, MD) and procedure guidance (Amy Sanghvi, MD).

After lunch an intensive hands-on session with live models, task simulators and sim cases rounded out the experience.

Lung ultrasound goes viral for flu season

Zlines 300x290 Lung ultrasound goes viral for flu seasonMore lung ultrasound tips and examples from Drs. Jim Tsung and Brittany Pardue Jones!

Bacterial pneumonia will manifest as lung consolidation with air bronchograms. The A-line pattern of normal lung will begin to be replaced by B-lines in the area of affected lung:

Here we’ve highlighted the consolidation from the above video as well:

large PNA piclabel Lung ultrasound goes viral for flu season

In contrast, subpleural consolidations and confluent B-lines are more suggestive of viral pneumonia.
So what do these look like?

Subpleural consolidation:

and another example:

Confluent B-Lines:

occur when multiple B-lines coalesce. In contrast, the next example demonstrates multiple discrete B-lines.

Multiple B-Lines:

And now for something completely different

Z-Lines:  Comet tails that arise from the pleural line but DO NOT make it to the bottom of the ultrasound screen. These are not B-lines. These artifacts have not been associated with any pathology, and they do not obliterate A-lines.

For more details on the sonographic appearance of viral lung pathology, check out this article by Jim Tsung.

Lung Ultrasound Pitfalls

US lung consolidation Tsung 500x514 Lung Ultrasound PitfallsThoracic sonography is one of the most rapidly growing areas of emergency and critical care ultrasound. One very important emerging indication is to assess for lung consolidation. The characteristic appearance of consolidated lung is very sensitive and specific for pneumonia, but novices should heed some important pitfalls in making the diagnosis.

Special thanks to Jim Tsung, MD, MPH and Brittany Jones, MD for their tips, videos, and ongoing research in this important field! For further reading on this topic, please see this article.

Pitfall #1 – confusing thymus for a consolidation

Normal thymus in sagittal view:

Thymus (top half of screen) and heart (bottom right). Don’t confuse thymus for lung consolidation. Note there are no air bronchograms, but thymus has a faint speckled appearance.

Normal thymus in transverse view:

Thymus (top half of screen) and heart (bottom right). Don’t confuse thymus for lung consolidation. Note there are no air bronchograms, but thymus has a faint speckled appearance
Pneumonia adjacent to Thymus in transverse view:

Lung consolidation with air bronchograms (top left) adjacent to normal thymus (speckled appearance on top right) with heart (bottom right)

Pitfall #2 – mistaking spleen for consolidation.

This is an important pitfall for everyone to know about. The same issue applies to the liver & stomach. The sensitivity of lung US for pneumonia rises >90% if this mistake is avoided.

Left lower chest- sagittal view:

Be careful scanning the left lower chest (left anterior and left axillary line) – air in stomach and spleen may look like pneumonia if you don’t realize that you have scanned inferior to the diaphragm and past the end of the pleural line. Most common error by novices.

Left lower chest- transverse view:

Be careful scanning the left lower chest (left anterior and left axillary line) – air in stomach and spleen may look like pneumonia if you don’t realize that you have scanned inferior to the diaphragm and past the end of the pleural line.

Pitfall #3- missing pleural effusion

Here are a few examples to refresh your memory.

Left pleural effusion:

Identify:

  • Pleural effusion (anechoic wedge just beneath ribs and pleura)
  • Lung
  • Diaphragm
  • Spleen
  • Air in stomach

Do not confuse spleen and air in stomach for pneumonia.

Right pleural effusion:

Identify:

  • Pleural effusion
  • Lung
  • Diaphragm
  • Liver

2012 Ultrasound CME conference

The Mount Sinai Department of Emergency Medicine hosted its annual ultrasound CME conference held on March 22 at the Stern Auditorium.

Faculty, fellows and PAs from a number of institutions took part in our eighth annual conference.

The course was directed by Bret Nelson, MD and topics included ultrasound physics (Leila PoSaw, MD, MPH) and assessment of  airway and breathing (Jim Tsung, MD, MPH), circulation (Daniel Singer, MD), disability/trauma (Phil Andrus, MD) and procedure guidance (Danny Duque, MD).

Great lectures by Sinai’s Emergency Ultrasound faculty were followed by an intensive hands-on scanning session.

Lung Ultrasound Guidelines

pleura gif Lung Ultrasound GuidelinesCongratulations to Sinai’s own Dr. Jim Tsung, who recently coauthored a major evidence-based consensus guideline on point-of-care lung ultrasound. The manuscript is the result of a multi-national effort by pioneering clinician-sonographers, and was just published in the journal Intensive Care Medicine:

International evidence-based recommendations for point-of-care lung ultrasound.

Volpicelli G, Elbarbary M, Blaivas M, Lichtenstein DA, Mathis G, Kirkpatrick AW, Melniker L, Gargani L, Noble VE, Via G, Dean A, Tsung JW, Soldati G, Copetti R, Bouhemad B, Reissig A, Agricola E, Rouby JJ, Arbelot C, Liteplo A, Sargsyan A, Silva F, Hoppmann R, Breitkreutz R, Seibel A, Neri L, Storti E, Petrovic T; International Liaison Committee on Lung Ultrasound (ILC-LUS) for the International Consensus Conference on Lung Ultrasound (ICC-LUS).

Intensive Care Med. 2012 Mar 6. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID: 22392031

SPR Fellow Clinical Research Award

skull fx SPR Fellow Clinical Research Award

Sinai’s own Dr. Lana Friedman, Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellow, was just named one of three recipients of the prestigious SPR Fellow Clinical Research Award. Her abstract entitled, “Accuracy of Point-of-Care Ultrasound (PoCUS) by Novice Pediatric Emergency Sonologists in the Diagnosis of Skull Fractures,” was selected from a very competitive pool of submissions. She will present the abstract at the PAS meeting in Denver in April.
Congratulations to Dr. Friedman and her research advisor, Dr. Jim Tsung!

XRS- Rib pain

32 year old female with no past medical history presents with cough for two weeks, no fever, no sputum. Multiple sick contacts with same symptoms at work. She acutely presents with left rib pain for several days.  She reports no trauma, and noted the sharp, positional pain during a fit of coughing. Her vital signs are all within normal limits. She is breathing comfortably, with good air movement, no wheezes, rales, or ronchi. She displays point tenderness over her anterior left 8th rib at the anterior axillary line.  A chest x-ray was ordered; images are below.

 

Sonopalpation of the tender area revealed the following:

Untitled from Sinai EM Ultrasound on Vimeo.

 

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