Tag Archives: Nelson

WCUME14

WCUME 2014

WCUME14 001 500x137 WCUME 2014The Third Annual World Congress on Ultrasound in Medical Education was hosted at the Oregon Health and Science University in Portland. Co-sponsored by SUSME and WINFOCUS, the conference highlights research and innovation in ultrasound for education. Over 500 students, residents, and educators from all specialties around the world were in attendance.

Bret Nelson presented research on Mount Sinai’s experience with an integrated ultrasound curriculum for medical students. Scores of other schools described their experiences as well, including South Carolina, UC Irvine, Wayne State, Ohio State, A.T. Still University, and many more.

An incredibly passionate and eloquent group of medical students really made this congress special. They were integral to many hands-on training sessions, described research on ultrasound education throughout the U.S. and abroad, and gave plenary talks on the impact of ultrasound on their educational experience.

Thought leaders from around the globe shared their experiences in education and inspired attendees to return to their own institutions and build their own programs. The Ultrasound Podcast guys, Mike Mallin and Matt Dawson, hosted an Ultrasound World Cup whose production values rivaled any televised sporting event.

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2014 Emergency and Critical Care Ultrasound CME Course

The Mount Sinai Department of Emergency Medicine hosted its annual ultrasound CME conference on April 25. Faculty, fellows, nurses and PAs from a number of institutions and specialties took part in our tenth annual course.

The course was directed by Bret Nelson, MD who introduced ultrasound physics and machine controls, followed by lectures on assessment of  airway and breathing (Jim Tsung, MD, MPH), cardiovascular ultrasound (Jennifer Huang, DO), trauma evaluation (Phil Andrus, MD) and procedure guidance (Amy Sanghvi, MD).

After lunch an intensive hands-on session with live models, task simulators and sim cases rounded out the experience.

Faculty group photo

SonoSweden 2014 course

At the end of January, Bret Nelson joined an incredible team of international a faculty for the largest SonoSweden course to date. Course director Christofer Muhr hosted this unique, intensive hands-on conference at the scenic Yasuragi hotel in Stockholm, Sweden. Over thirty faculty and one hundred participants took part in this three-day course.

Among the faculty were lung ultrasound pioneer Vicki Noble, Matt Dawson and Mike Mallin (creators of the Ultrasound Podscast) and others from around the globe.

Registration is not yet open for the 2015 course, but check out the SonoSweden website for a countdown timer- there were over 100 people on the waiting list for this year’s course!

Last days of the stethoscope?

GH TOC 500x381 Last days of the stethoscope?In the current issue of Global Heart (journal of the World Heart Foundation), several Mount Sinai authors have published articles on the use of point-of-care ultrasound. Phil Andrus wrote about focused cardiac ultrasound, Jennifer Huang co-authored a review of ultrasound use in IVC assessment, Daniel Lakoff described ultrasound incorporation into rapid response teams in inpatient wards, and Bret Nelson and Amy Sanghvi wrote a review of non-cardiologist use of cardiac ultrasound.

Bret Nelson and Global Heart Editor-in-Chief Jagat Narula wrote the editorial for the issue, which focused on improvements in ultrasound technology creating new opportunities and markets for ultrasound use. One theme of the editorial was whether ultrasound could replace the stethoscope, and as you may imagine the press has picked up on that thread!
CBS news visited Mount Sinai and interviewed Drs. Nelson and Narula.
And a number of media outlets have covered the story, including Popular Mechanics, the Huffington Post and others.
Mount Sinai has incorporated ultrasound into medical student education in Gross Anatomy since 2006, and last year began a curriculum in focused ultrasound as part of the physical examination course.

ACEP National Faculty Teaching Award

The American College of Emergency Physicians awarded its annual National Faculty Teaching award in Seattle this year during the Academic Affairs committee meeting.

Bret Nelson, Director of the Emergency Ultrasound Division at Mount Sinai, was one of four faculty honored nationally.

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Left to right: Federico E. Vaca, MD, MPH; Vicken Y. Totten, MD, MS, FACEP; Bret P. Nelson, MD, RDMS, FACEP; Yashwant Chathampally, MD, MS

According to ACEP,

The American College of Emergency Physicians sponsors a national faculty teaching and junior faculty teaching award to honor outstanding educators in emergency medicine. These awards are designed to support emergency medicine faculty in their efforts to achieve academic advancement, as well as support the continued academic development of the specialty. The awards recognize superior teaching activities including didactic lectures, clinical instruction, the development of innovative educational programs, as well as the endorsement by faculty, residents, and students.

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2013 Tri-State Ultrasound Fellow Conference

The first annual Tri-State Ultrasound Fellow Conference kicked off today at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. The first day of this two-day course focused on administrative issues in ultrasound, featuring nationally recognized speakers from all around the area.

Bret Nelson from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai discussed faculty development, including:

  • Creating a niche
  • The educator portfolio
  • Making connections

Here are a few references from the talk:

 

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Ultrasound Zen

ZenStone 500x333 Ultrasound Zen To image something which moves, you must remain still. To image something which is still, you must move.

If you think on this long enough, the point is self-evident and requires no explanation. Or, just see some examples below.

We are pretty well adapted to seeing three dimensions at a time. Thus when imaging a moving structure like the heart, we hold the probe in a fixed position to obtain standard views. This allows us to focus on the movement, and cardiac presets optimize temporal resolution at the expense of spatial resolution. We are then seeing two spatial dimensions and one temporal dimension (heart moving in time).

D Shaped Left Ventricle from Sinai EM Ultrasound on Vimeo.

It is very difficult to appreciate the anatomy and function of the heart, for example,  when the probe is moving.

In contrast, imaging the right upper quadrant for fluid in Morison’s pouch requires a slow fan through the liver, diaphragm, and kidney. This allows us to appreciate the entire potential space where fluid can collect. Abdominal imaging is optimized for spatial resolution at the expense of temporal resolution, so be sure to move the probe slowly. Fanning through the entire structure of interest will often reveal pathology which was missed with a single-plane scan. Small gallstones, small amounts of peritoneal or pleural fluid, saccular aneurysms, and other maladies can fool a novice sonographer who isn’t thorough. In this case we are seeing three spatial dimensions.

FAST1 RUQ pos from Sinai EM Ultrasound on Vimeo.

So, keep your audience in mind when you are creating scans. Should you fan through the static anatomy, or let the movement of the structures speak for themselves?