Hertz so Good – Sonogames 2014

Congratulation, Raashee, Jeremy and George,

Sinai’s team “Hertz so Good” finally made it past the first round, finishing seventh out of thirty-six teams!!

Sinai Sonogames

For the past two years, Boston University has taken home the Sonocup.  This year we are dedicated to at least coming a little bit closer to bringing the cup home. Hertz so Good, our sonoteam, is George Lim, Raashee Kedia and Jeremy Faust.  Indomitable.

Except in Round one of our Mock Sonogames, where the Sonoteam answered fewer multiple choice questions correctly than the three teams that tied for first: the Endocavitary Probes, The Spice Girls and R2D2.

Round 2 brought us to the 8th floor conference room, where Amy Sanghvi, Dan Lakoff, Liz Dei Rossi, Tish Harper and Raashee Kedia had set up four hands on challenge stations.

George Lim dominating Dan Lakoff in Beat the Expert.

2014-05-07 10.38.18

Aldo Gutierrez with some pericompetition in-line vascular access teaching for Jeremy Kim.2014-05-07 10.38.31

Head to Head Blinded team v-scanning  by Brendan Milliner (i think)2014-05-07 10.39.08

After Round 2 the Spice Girls jumped out to a big lead with 42 points.  But the head to head competition favored the prepared.  The Sono Team, who memorized the five articles distributed for the national sonogames competition, rocketed past all adversaries to win the grand prize of a dinner in Dallas.

Congratulations Raashee, George and @jeremyfaust.  Now bring home the cup.

Is it time?

DraftCard

Every year in December my ARDMS renewal would arrive.  It was only $75 to renew, so I did.  My enthusiasm for this badge steadily declined from the early heady days after taking the Edelman course (which I thought was awesome).  But this year, I burned my card.  Resa Lewiss and Mike Stone have a great “clinical controversies” editorial in this month’s Annals of Emergency Medicine.

You should read it… and then burn your card.*

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* unless you are Bret Nelson MD RDMS FACEP and you’ve embroidered RDMS on all of your custom white coats.

Castlefest 2014 is Live

Matt and Mike and their entourage are live at Castlefest. This year they have a live feed available in case you weren’t able to make it to Kentucky. Check in with their lectures live with the youtube feed below.

Cardiac Arrest Ultrasound AIUM 2014

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As promised, references from today’s lecture.

Background

1. Arntfield RT, and Millington SJ. Point of care cardiac ultrasound applications in the emergency department and intensive care unit–a review. Curr Cardiol Rev. 2012, May;8(2): 98-108.
2. Bocka JJ, Overton DT, and Hauser A. Electromechanical dissociation in human beings: an echocardiographic evaluation. Ann Emerg Med. 1988, May;17(5):450-2.

3. Giraud R, Siegenthaler N, Schussler O, Kalangos A, Müller H, Bendjelid K, and Banfi C. The LUCAS 2 Chest Compression Device Is Not Always Efficient: An Echographic Confirmation. Ann Emerg Med. 2014, Feb 12;
4. Hollister N, Bond R, Donovan A, and Nicholls B. Saved by focused echo evaluation in resuscitation. Emerg Med J. 2011, Nov;28(11):986-9.

5. Niendorff DF, Rassias AJ, Palac R, Beach ML, Costa S, and Greenberg M. Rapid cardiac ultrasound of inpatients suffering PEA arrest performed by nonexpert sonographers. Resuscitation. 2005, Oct;67(1):81-7.
6. Rich S, Wix HL, and Shapiro EP. Clinical assessment of heart chamber size and valve motion during cardiopulmonary resuscitation by two-dimensional echocardiography. Am Heart J. 1981, Sep;102(3 Pt 1):368-73.

7. Werner A, Greene L, Janko L, and Cobb A. Visualization of cardiac valve motion in man during external chest compression using two-dimensional echocardiography. Implications regarding the mechanism of blood flow. Circulation. 1981, Jun 1;63(6):1417-1421.

Prognosis in Cardiac Arrest Ultrasound

1. Aichinger G, Zechner PM, Prause G, Sacherer F, Wildner G, Anderson CL, et al. Cardiac movement identified on prehospital echocardiography predicts outcome in cardiac arrest patients. Prehosp Emerg Care. 2012;16(2):251-5.
2. Breitkreutz R, Price S, Steiger HV, Seeger FH, Ilper H, Ackermann H, et al. Focused echocardiographic evaluation in life support and peri-resuscitation of emergency patients: a prospective trial. Resuscitation. 2010, Nov;81(11):1527-33.

3. Cohn B. Does the absence of cardiac activity on ultrasonography predict failed resuscitation in cardiac arrest? Ann Emerg Med. 2013, Aug;62(2):180-1.
4. Cureton EL, Yeung LY, Kwan RO, Miraflor EJ, Sadjadi J, Price DD, and Victorino GP. The heart of the matter: utility of ultrasound of cardiac activity during traumatic arrest. J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2012, Jul;73(1):102-10.

5. Hayhurst C, Lebus C, Atkinson PR, Kendall R, Madan R, Talbot J, et al. An evaluation of echo in life support (ELS): is it feasible? What does it add? Emerg Med J. 2011, Feb;28(2):119-21.
6. Kudenchuk PJ, Cobb LA, Copass MK, Cummins RO, Doherty AM, Fahrenbruch CE, et al. Amiodarone for resuscitation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation. N Engl J Med. 1999, Sep 16;341(12):871-8.

7. Nelson BP, Patel VR, Norris MM, and Richardson BK. The utility of cardiac sonography and capnography in predicting outcome in cardiac arrest. International journal of emergency medicine. 2008;1(3):213-5.
8. Salen P, O’Connor R, Sierzenski P, Passarello B, Pancu D, Melanson S, et al. Can cardiac sonography and capnography be used independently and in combination to predict resuscitation outcomes? Academic emergency medicine : official journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine. 2001;8(6):610-5.

9. Salen P, Melniker L, Chooljian C, Rose JS, Alteveer J, Reed J, and Heller M. Does the presence or absence of sonographically identified cardiac activity predict resuscitation outcomes of cardiac arrest patients? Am J Emerg Med. 2005, Jul;23(4):459-62.

10. Schuster KM, Lofthouse R, Moore C, Lui F, Kaplan LJ, and Davis KA. Pulseless electrical activity, focused abdominal sonography for trauma, and cardiac contractile activity as predictors of survival after trauma. J Trauma. 2009, Dec;67(6):1154-7.

11. Schuster KM, and Davis KA. Response to “Pulseless electrical activity focused abdominal sonography for trauma, and cardiac contractile activity as predictors of survival after trauma”. J Trauma. 2010, May;68(5):1270.

12. Tayal VS, and Kline JA. Emergency echocardiography to detect pericardial effusion in patients in PEA and near-PEA states. Resuscitation. 2003, Dec;59(3):315-318.
13. Tomruk O, Erdur B, Cetin G, Ergin A, Avcil M, and Kapci M. Assessment of Cardiac Ultrasonography in Predicting Outcome in Adult Cardiac Arrest. Journal of International Medical Research. 2012, Apr 1;40(2):804-809.

Algorithmic approach to Cardiac Arrest Ultrasound

1. Amaya SC, and Langsam A. Ultrasound detection of ventricular fibrillation disguised as asystole. Ann Emerg Med. 1999, Mar;33(3):344-6.

2. Blyth L, Atkinson P, Gadd K, and Lang E. Bedside focused echocardiography as predictor of survival in cardiac arrest patients: a systematic review. Acad Emerg Med. 2012, Oct;19(10): 1119-26.

3. Chardoli M, Heidari F, Rabiee H, Sharif-Alhoseini M, Shokoohi H, and Rahimi-Movaghar V. Echocardiography integrated ACLS protocol versus conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation in patients with pulseless electrical activity cardiac arrest. Chin J Traumatol. 2012;15(5):284-7.

4. Hernandez C, Shuler K, Hannan H, Sonyika C, Likourezos A, and Marshall J. C.A.U.S.E.: Cardiac arrest ultra-sound exam–a better approach to managing patients in primary non- arrhythmogenic cardiac arrest. Resuscitation. 2008, Feb;76(2):198-206.

5. Horowitz R, Gossett JG, Bailitz J, Wax D, and Pierce MC. The FLUSH Study-Flush the Line and Ultrasound the Heart: Ultrasonographic Confirmation of Central Femoral Venous Line Placement. Ann Emerg Med. 2014, Jan 15;

6. Mallin M, Curtis K, Dawson M, Ockerse P, and Ahern M. Accuracy of ultrasound-guided marking of the cricothyroid membrane before simulated failed intubation. The American Journal of Emergency Medicine. 2014, Jan;32(1):61-63.

7. Nagdev A, and Mantuani D. A novel in-plane technique for ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis. Am J Emerg Med. 2013, Sep;31(9):1424.e5-9.

8. Pfeiffer P, Rudolph SS, Børglum J, and Isbye DL. Temporal comparison of ultrasound vs. auscultation and capnography in verification of endotracheal tube placement. Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2011, Nov;55(10):1190-5.

9. Pfeiffer P, Bache S, Isbye DL, Rudolph SS, Rovsing L, and Børglum J. Verification of endotracheal intubation in obese patients – temporal comparison of ultrasound vs. auscultation and capnography. Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2012, May;56(5):571-6.
10. Weingart SW, Duque DD, and Nelson BN. The RUSH Exam – Rapid Ultrasound for Shock / Hypotension [Internet]. ACEP-EMED Home. 2009, Apr 3;[cited 2011, Jan 9] Available from: http:// www.webcitation.org/5vyzOaPYU

Future of Cardiac Arrest Ultrasound

1. Abbasi S, Farsi D, Zare MA, Hajimohammadi M, Rezai M, and Hafezimoghadam P. Direct ultrasound methods: a confirmatory technique for proper endotracheal intubation in the emergency department. Eur J Emerg Med. 2014, Jan 16;

2. Blaivas M. Transesophageal echocardiography during cardiopulmonary arrest in the emergency department. Resuscitation. 2008, Aug;78(2):135-40.

3. Copetti R. Clinical Integrated Ultrasound in Peri Cardiac Arrest and Cardiac Arrest. J Clinic Experiment Cardiol S. 2012;102.

4. Doepp Connolly F, Reitemeier J, Storm C, Hasper D, and Schreiber SJ. Duplex sonography of cerebral blood flow after cardiac arrest-A prospective observational study. Resuscitation. 2013, Dec 30;

5. Hogan TS. External cardiac compression may be harmful in some scenarios of pulseless electrical activity. Med Hypotheses. 2012, Oct;79(4):445-7.

6. van der Wouw PA, Koster RW, Delemarre BJ, de Vos R, Lampe-Schoenmaeckers AJ, and Lie KI. Diagnostic accuracy of transesophageal echocardiography during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. J Am Coll Cardiol. 1997, Sep;30(3):780-3.
7. Vieillard-Baron A, Slama M, Mayo P, Charron C, Amiel JB, Esterez C, et al. A pilot study on safety and clinical utility of a single-use 72-hour indwelling transesophageal echocardiography probe. Intensive Care Med. 2013, Apr;39(4):629-35.

 

 

Last days of the stethoscope?

Global Heart Title PageIn the current issue of Global Heart (journal of the World Heart Foundation), several Mount Sinai authors have published articles on the use of point-of-care ultrasound. Phil Andrus wrote about focused cardiac ultrasound, Jennifer Huang co-authored a review of ultrasound use in IVC assessment, Daniel Lakoff described ultrasound incorporation into rapid response teams in inpatient wards, and Bret Nelson and Amy Sanghvi wrote a review of non-cardiologist use of cardiac ultrasound.

Bret Nelson and Global Heart Editor-in-Chief Jagat Narula wrote the editorial for the issue, which focused on improvements in ultrasound technology creating new opportunities and markets for ultrasound use. One theme of the editorial was whether ultrasound could replace the stethoscope, and as you may imagine the press has picked up on that thread!
CBS news visited Mount Sinai and interviewed Drs. Nelson and Narula.
And a number of media outlets have covered the story, including Popular Mechanics, the Huffington Post and others.
Mount Sinai has incorporated ultrasound into medical student education in Gross Anatomy since 2006, and last year began a curriculum in focused ultrasound as part of the physical examination course.

January 23rd NYC RESUS Rounds

Spectacular rounds this week lead by Sahar Ahmad of Stonybrook and hosted by Pierre at BI.

Sahar gave a great presentation on her didactic program for the critical care fellows at Stonybrook.  She then presented a series of discussion inducing cases.  Carl Kaplan (of Stonybrook not RUSH) presented an interesting case of ONSD ultrasound for hydrocephalus.  Sam Parnia gave a presentation on the cardiopulmonary resuscitation research being done at Stonybrook on cerebral oximetry.

Some of the articles (with pmid and link) that came up in discussion were:

  • The Lung US Consensus Recommendations: 22392031
  • Copetti ARDS vs Pulmonary Edema: 18442425
  • NASA MRI Optic Nerve sheath: 22416248
  • Louis Eisen Optic Nerve sheath: 21519957
  • Flawed Pediatric Optic nerve sheath article 19167786 
  • re “reverse” FALLS protocol – Vicki Noble’s on bline resolution at dialysis 19188552

See you next time.